An Irish Myth Concordance A-C D-L M-Z

An Irish Myth Concordance
by Mike Nichol

copyright 1985 c.e.
by MicroMuse Press


[This information may be reproduced and distributed exactly as is, without further permission from the author, provided the statement of authorship and copyright are retained, and provided it is offered free of charge. Changes in the text, however, must be approved in advance by the author. MicroMuse Press is a division of The Magick Lantern, 1715 Westport Road, Kansas City, MO 64111. 816/531-7265]

'Myth is what we call other people's religion.'
--Joseph Campbell

The following concordance is based on 'Gods and Fighting Men' by Lady Augusta Gregory, first published in 1904. Page number references are to the 1976 trade paperback edition published by the MacMillan Company of Canada Limited. Brief supplimentary material is taken from 'Dictionary of Irish Myth and Legend' by Ronan Coghlan, published in 1979 by Donard Publishing Comapany, and referenced as 'DIM' in the following text.

As this is intended to be a concordance of the Irish mythological cycle only (as opposed to heroic, legendary, or historical material), references are limited to Part I, Books I - V, of Lady Gregory's volume. 'Gods and Fighting Men' was selected as the primary text for this concordance because it represents the most comprehensive synthesis of variant sources (both published and oral) ever attempted as a continuous narrative of Irish mythology. Lady Gregory lists her published sources as follows:

O'Curry, 'Manners and Customs of the Ancient Irish'
'MSS. Materials'
'Atlantis'
De Jubainville, 'Cycle Mythologique'
'Epope'e Celtique'
Hennessy, 'Chronicum Scotorum'
Atkinson, 'Book of Leinster'
'Annals of the Four Masters'
Nennius, 'Hist. Brit.' (Irish Version)
Zimmer, 'Glossae Hibernacae'
Whitley Stokes, 'Three Irish Glossaries'
'Revue Celtique'
'Irische Texte'
'Gaedelica'
'Dinnsenchus'
Nutt, 'Voyage of Bran'
'Proceedings Ossianic Society'
O'Beirne Crowe, 'Arma Columcille'
Dean of Lismore's Book
Windisch, 'Irische Texte'
Hennessy et. al., 'Revue Celtique'
'Kilkenny Archaeological Journal'
Keatinge's 'History'
'Oyia'
Curtin's 'Folk Tales'
'Proceedings Royal Irish Academy'
'MSS. Series'
Dr. Sigerson, 'Bards of Gael and Gall'
Miscellanies, 'Celtic Society'
Muller, 'Revue Celtique'
Standish Hayes O'Grady, 'Silva Gaedelica'

Abhean - son of Bicelmos, he was the harper of the Tuatha de Danaan, brought from the hills by the Men of the Three Gods (37).

Aedh (1) - killed by Brian, he was one of the three sons of Miochaoin (q.v.), the others being Corc and Conn (59)

Aedh (2) - along with Angus and Artrach, one of the three sons of Bodb Dearg, he was the comeliest of them. Troops of poets from Ireland and Alban used to be with him, so that his place was called 'The Rath of Aedh of the Poets' (78).

Aedh (3) - a son of the Dagda, he was killed by Corrgenn, who suspected Aedh was involved with his wife (82)

Aer - one of two Druids of the Sons of the Gael (the other was Eithis) who was killed in the first battle against the Tuatha De Danaan, and was given a great burial (75)

Ai - the plain where Niall pursued Cailcheir, before it went through a lake (81)

Aife - along with two other daughters of Midhir of the Yellow Hair, Doirenn and Aillbhe, she was given as wife to one of the three sons of Lugaidh Menn (79).

Ailbhe - (Ai-noo-al) one of the three daughters of Oilell and a foster-child of Bodb Dearg (124)

Ailell Anglonach - of the One Fault, brother of Eochaid Feidlech, he fell in love with his brother's wife, Etain, and pined for her until she agreed to heal him (95)

Aillbhe - along with two other daughters of Midhir of the Yellow Hair, Doirenn and Aife, she was given as wife to one of the three sons of Lugaidh Menn (79).

Aille - the daughter of Cormac (q.v.) (107)

Aine (1) - the daughter of Modharn, who gave a cook to the sons of Lugaidh Menn (79)

Aine (2) - some said she was the daughter of Manannan, but some said she was the Morrigu, she owned the Cathair Aine. But she often gave her love to men, and she was called Leanan Sidhe, the Sweetheart of the Sidhe (86). Wisps of straw are burned in her honor on St. John's Eve. She is associated with meadow-sweet, and invoked against sickness. According to legend, she was raped by the king of Munster (DIM).

Ainge - she was a daughter of the Dagda, who made her a great vat (81)

Airmed - sister of Miach, she spread her cloak on which to arrange the herbs which sprang from the grave of her murdered brother. But Diancecht, still jealous of Miach, mixed up the herbs, so that no one knows all their right powers to this day (35). She was the daughter of Diancecht and sister of Octruil, and helped them in their healing work at the well of Slaine (64)

Airnelach - brother of Tadg and Eoghan, he was captured by Cathmann and made to cut firing (115), but was later rescued by Tadg (120)

Amergin - one of the sons of Miled (q.v.), he spoke with Banba upon Slieve Mis (71) and was sent as messenger to the Tuatha De Danaan (72) and quieted the storm sent against his people by them and was the first to set foot in Ireland after that (74). Heber gave him a share of the two provinces of Munster after the Battle of Tailltin (75).

Angus - along with Artrach and Aedh, one of the three sons of Bodb Dearg (78)

Angus Og - son of the Dagda, he advised his father how to kill Cridenbel and what reward to ask of Bres (33). After the second battle of Magh Tuireadh, only four men of the Fomor were left in Ireland, and they were driven out one Samhain night by Morrigu and Angus Og (67). He was considered for kingship of the Tuatha de Danaan after their defeat (77). Also called the Frightener or Disturber, for the unrest he occasioned in horses and cattle (83). His loves included Enghi, Derbrenn, and Caer Ormaith (84). He was the Irish love-god (DIM).

Anvil of the Dese - see Indeoin na Dese (81)

Aobh - (Aev, or Eev) the eldest of the three daughters of Oilell, foster-daughter of Bodb Dearg and wife of Lir and, by him, mother of Fionnuala, Aodh, Fiachra, and Conn, though she died bringing the latter two to birth (125)

Aodh - (Ae, rhyming to 'day') one of the four children of Lir and Aobh, he was turned into a swan by Aoife, Lir's jealous second wife (126)

Aodh Aithfhiosach - of the quick wits, a son of Bodb Dearg, he was sent in search of the children of Lir (132)

Aoibhell - (Evill) a woman of the Sidhe who dwelt at Craig Liath, she tried to prevent her lover from joining a battle (87). Her harp fortells death for any who hear it (88).

Aoife - (Eefa) one of the three daughters of Oilell and a foster-child of Bodb Dearg (124), she became the wife of Lir after her sister Aobh had died in childbirth (125). Through jealousy, she changed Aobh's four children into swans at Loch Dairbhreach (126)

Aonbharr - styled 'of the One Mane', he is Manannan's horse, as swift as the naked cold wind of spring. She can gallop across the sea, and no rider was ever killed off her back (41). She was often ridden by Lugh (43).

Arias - styled the 'fair-haired poet', one of the four wise men and teachers of the Tuatha de Danaan before they came to Ireland. His home was Finias (27).

Arranan - one of the sons of Miled (q.v.), he died by falling from the mast to the deck of his ship as the Sons of the Gael attempted their second landing in Ireland (73)

Artrach - along with Angus and Aedh, one of the three sons of Bodb Dearg, he had a house with seven doors and taught the king's son of Ireland and of Alban how to throw spears and darts (78)

Athluain - a ford of the Shannon that Lugh passed on his way to do battle with Bres (45)

Badb - (Bibe) one of the greatest of the women of the Tuatha de Danaan, she was a battle goddess (27). She, along with Macha and Morrigu , used powers of enchantment to bring mists , clouds of darkness, and showers of fire and blood over the Firbolgs at Teamhair for three days (29). Sometimes regarded as the same as Nemain, her name means 'crow' and she could appear in that guise. She was the wife of Net (DIM).


Balor - styled 'of the Evil Eye' or 'of the Strong Blows' (38), he is chief king of the Fomor (36), husband of Ceithlenn and, by her, the father of Ethlinn (42). One of his eyes had the power of death in it, so that none could look at it and live (38), and he also had the power of putting on a different shape (39). He was also the father of 12 'white-mouthed' sons, all among the chief men of the Fomor (42). At the second battle of Magh Tuireadh, Lugh made a spear cast that brought Balor's evil eye out through the back of his head, instantly killing him and 27 of his own army, thus fulfilling the prophecy that he would be killed by his grandson (66).


Banba - the wife of MacCuill and a queen of the Tuatha De Danaan, one of three daughters of the Dagda whose name was given to Ireland afterwards (27), she met the Sons of the Gael on Slieve Mis and spoke with Amergin (71), and was later killed in the Battle of Tailltin (75).


Banna - one of the twelve chief rivers of Ireland (q.v.) (62)


Battle of Taillten - the great battle between the Sons of the Gael and the Tuatha De Danaan, after which the Sons of the Gael had the rulership of Ireland (75)


Bearna nah-Eadargana - the Gap of Separation, it is a place that Lugh passed on his way to do battle with Bres (45)


Bechulle - one of two witches of the Tuatha De Danaan (the other was Dianan) who had the power to turn trees and stones and sods of earth into an armed host (62)


Bed of the Dagda - in the house of the Dagda at the Brugh na Boinne (80)


Beinn Edair - the dwelling place of Tuireann (60), mentioned briefly in Ethne's complaint (58)


Belgata - the great mountain to the rear of Magh Nia in Connacht (29)


Beltaine - May Day (28)


Bennai Boirche - one of the twelve chief mountains of Ireland (q.v.) (62)


Berbhe - see Green of Berbhe (42)


Betach - see Fiachna (121)


Bicelmos - see Abhean (37)


Birog - styled 'of the Mountain', a woman-Druid who helped Cian win the love of Ethlinn who had been imprisoned in a tower. When Ethlinn bore a child (Lugh), Balor would have had it killed, but Birog rescued it (40).


Birthplace of Cermait Honey-Mouth - in the house of the Dagda at the Brugh na Boinne (80)


Blai-Slieve - one of the twelve chief mountains of Ireland (q.v.) (62)


Boann - a water goddess, wife of Nechtan and mother, by the Dagda, of Angus, she is associated with the River Boyne (DIM). Also see Dabilla (80)


Bodb - (Bove) see Rudrach and Dergcroche (117)


Bodb Dearg - (Bove Darrig) son of the Dagda, he was king of Connacht when Bres and his army landed in Ireland to battle Lugh (43). He lived at Sidhe Femen, was eldest among the children of the Dagda, and was given the kingship of the Tuatha de Danaan after their defeat (77). His three sons were Angus, Artrach, and Aedh (78), his daughter was Scathniamh (80) and his musician was Fertuinne (79). Two other sons were Aodh Aithfhiosach and Fergus Fithchiollach (132)


Boinn - variant of Boinne, one of the twelve chief rivers of Ireland (q.v.) (62)


Boinne - the salmon of the dumb Boinne are mentioned briefly in Ethne's complaint (58)


Bran (1) - the son of Tuiren (68)


Bran (2) - son of Febal, he was called by the silver branch to board a boat and journey to the Land of Women, Tir na mBan (105)


Brath - see Mide (68)


Breagan - see Cuailgne (75)


Bres - son of Eri and Elathan (35), a champion of the Tuatha de Danaan, he was sent to meet Sreng of the Firbolgs (28). He was the most beautiful of all the young men, and he was chosen king after Nuada (31). 'As beautiful as Bres' was a common saying. However, he was known for his lack of hospitality (32), and was deposed when Nuada was reinstated as king (35). By Brigit, he was father of Ruadan (64).


Bresal Etarlaim - the Druid who helped Fuamach to destroy Etain (88)


Bri - the daughter of Midhir, she died of a broken heart because she could not be with her love, Leith, and the hill of Bri Leith, the spot where she died, was named for them (88)


Bri Leith - home of Midhir the Proud (77), named after his daughter Bri, and her love Leith (88)


Bri Ruri - one of the twelve chief mountains of Ireland (q.v.) (62)


Brian - styled 'Flame of Valour' (60), along with Iuchar and Iucharba, he is one of the three sons of Tuireann (47) and his sister, the daughter of Tuireann, was Ethne (50). He had the power to change his own shape and that of his two brothers (51). He caused the death of Cian (44), Tuis (53), Pisear (54), Dobar (55), Miochaoin and his three sons (59).


Brigit - one of the greatest of the women of the Tuatha de Danaan, she was a woman of poetry, healing, and smith's work. Her name came from Breo-saighit, meaning a fiery arrow (27). She was daughter of the Dagda and, by Bres, mother of Ruadan (64)


Brugh na Boinn - (or Brugh na Boinne - 57) the place where Lugh kept the Scuabtuinne (50) and the place where the Dagda had his house which Angus took from him by trickery (81)


Buan - the nine lasting hazels of Buan dropped their nuts into the Well of Knowledge where the salmon would eat them, sending their husks floating out on the five streams that flowed from the well (108 & 110)


Buas - one of the twelve chief rivers of Ireland (q.v.) (62)

Caer of the Fair Hair - see Inis Cenn-fhinne (49)


Cailcheir - one of the swine of Debrann, it was called by Corann's harping (81)


Cainte - Cian, Cu, and Ceithen were the three sons of Cainte, and they had a long-standing feud with the three sons of Tuireann (43)


Cairbre - see Erc (31)


Camel - son of Riagall, he was one of the two door-keepers at Teamhair when Lugh first arrived (37)


Caoilte - (Cweeltia) one of the last of the Fianna, he was loved by Scathniamh (80)


Carn Corrslebe - a place near Loch Ce' (67)


Carpre - (variant of Corpre) he had the power to compose a satire that would shame men so they could not stand against fighting men (62)


Carpre Lifecar - the son of Cormac (q.v.) (107)


Cassmail - one of the Tuatha De Danaan, he was killed by Octriallach at the second battle of Magh Tuireadh (65)


Cathair Aine - a stone belonging to Aine that would cause madness in someone who sat on it (86)


Cathbad - the Druid, he aided Conchubar in treacherously slaying the sons of Usnach (97)


Cathmann - son of Tabarn and king of Fresen, he captured Tadg, his wife (whom he took as his own wife), and two brothers (115), but was later killed by him (120)


Cauldron - one of the four great treasures the Tuatha de Danaan brought to Ireland from the north. It came from the city of Murias, and no one ever went from it unsatisfied (27).


Ce' - the Druid of Nuada, he was wounded in the second battle of Magh Tuireadh, and when he died and was buried near Carn Corrslebe, a lake burst out over his grave and it was called Loch Ce'. (67)


Cecht - the plough (28)


Ceis Corain - the place where the champions of Connacht (all except Niall) gave up their pursuit of Cailcheir (81)


Ceithen - along with Cian (q.v.) and Cu, he was one of the three sons of Cainte. Cu and Ceithen went towards the south, while Cian went north, to gather the Riders of the Sidh to help Lugh in his battle with Bres (43).


Ceithlenn - styled 'of the Crooked Teeth, she was queen of the Fomor, the wife of Balor and, by him, the mother of Ethlinn (42) She gave the Dagda a dreadful wound at the second battle of Magh Tuireadh (65)


Celtchar of Cualu - see Leith (88)


Cermait - styled 'Honey-Mouth', son of the Dagda, his three sons shared the kingship of Ireland at the time of the invasion of the Sons of the Gael (72), and were killed in the Battle of Tailltin (75). His birthplace was the house of the Dagda at Brugh na Boinne (80).


Cesair - the first that ever reached Ireland, she later dwelt on Inislocha where Tadg met her (118)


Cesarn - one of the three Druids of the Firbolgs who broke the enchantment laid upon them by Badb, Macha, and Morrigu (30)


Children of Rudraighe - see Eimher (75)


Ciabhan - (Kee-a-van) of the Curling Hair, the King of Ulster's son, he went to Manannan's country (111), won the love of Cliodna, but lost her due to the treachery of Iuchnu (112)


Cian (1) - a man of the Tuatha de Danaan (27), brother of Goibniu and Samthainn (39), and father of Lugh by Ethlinn (37), he was present when Nechtan deceived King Bres (32). He lived at Druim na Teine (39), and his famous cow was the Glas Gaibhnenn (39). Along with two other brothers, Cu and Ceithen, he was one of the three sons of Cainte (43). He had the power of shape-shifting and was killed (by Brian) while in the form of a pig (44).


Cian (2) - son of Olioll and father of Tadg (114)


Cliach - the Harper of the King of the Three Rosses in Connacht, he vainly sought one of Bodb Dearg's daughters in marriage. Loch Bel Sead sprang up under his feet (77).


Cliodna - (Cleevna) of the Fair Hair, daughter of Gebann, she gave her love to Ciabhan but, through the treachery of Iuchnu, she was drowned (112) She had three colorful birds, whose sweet singing could lull the sick to sleep (DIM).


Codal - of the Withered Breast, he threw yew rods for Eochaid to discover the hiding place of Midhir and Etain (96)


Coir-cethar-chuin - 'the Four-Angled Music', it was another name for Uaitne (q.v.) (67)


Coll - the hazel-tree (28)


Collbrain - see Nechtan (106)


Colpa - one of the sons of Miled (q.v.), his ship was wrecked as the Sons of the Gael attempted their second landing in Ireland, and he drowned while trying to reach land at Inver Colpa (73)

Colum Cuaillemech - styled 'of the Three New Ways', he was a smith of the Tuatha de Danaan (37)


Comb and the Casket of the Dagda's wife - a hill near the house of the Dagda at Brugh na Boinne (80)


Compar - a messenger and tax-gatherer of the Fomor, he was one of the four hardest and most cruel, the other three being Eine, Eathfaigh, and Coron (41)


Conaire - High King of Ireland, grandson of Etain and Eochaid, who got his death by Midhir and his people (96)


Conall Cearnach - of the Red Branch of Ulster, he was descended from the line of the sons of Eimher (75) The slayer of Anluan, he originally may have been a horned god (DIM).


Conan Maol - it was his gold, hidden in a cairn, that Caoilte gave to Scathniamh as a bride-price (80) One of the Fianna, he was regarded as something of a buffoon (DIM).


Conchubar Abratrudh - of the Red Brows, the father of Liban (115)


Conn (1) - killed by Brian, he was one of the three sons of Miochaoin (q.v.), the others being Corc and Aedh (59)


Conn (2) - of the Hundred Battles, King of Teamhair, grandfather of Cormac (106), he tried to stop his son Connla from going to Manannan's country (113)


Conn (3) - one of the four children of Lir and Aobh, he was turned into a swan by Aoife, Lir's jealous second wife (126)


Connacht - one of the five provinces of Ireland (31), it is where the Tuatha de Danaan first landed (27). Both Magh Rein (28) and Magh Nia (with the mountain Belgata) were there (29), as well as the river Unius (61). It was the province chosen by Sreng for the Firbolgs after they were defeated by the Tuatha de Danaan (31).


Connla - of the Red Hair, son of Conn, he went to Manannnan's country despite his father's efforts to prevent it (113)


Coran - the Druid of Conn, he tried to keep Connla from being taken to Manannan's country (113)


Corann (1) - Lugh passed through the 'place of the bright-faced Corann' on his way to do battle with Bres (45)


Corann (2) - Diancecht's harper, and the best harper of the Dagda's household, he called Cailcheir with his harp (81)


Corc - killed by Brian, he was one of the three sons of Miochaoin (q.v.), the others being Conn and Aedh (59)


Cormac - grandson of Conn, King of Teamhair, he journeyed to Manannan's country to bring back his wife, Ethne; his daughter, Aille; and his son, Carpre Lifecar (106)


Coron - a messenger and tax-gatherer of the Fomor, he was one of the four hardest and most cruel, the other three being Eine, Eathfaigh, and Compar (41)


Corpre - son of Etain, he was a poet of the Tuatha de Danaan who cursed Bres for his lack of hospitality with the first satire ever made in Ireland (34)


Corr Slieve na Seaghsa - the Round Mountain of the Poet's Spring, it is a place that Lugh passed on his way to do battle with Bres (45)


Corrgenn - a great man of Connacht who, while visiting the Dagda, killed Aedh because he suspected him to be involved with his wife (82)


Craisech - thick-handled spears belonging to Sreng, they were sharp at the sides though they had no points (29)


Credenus - styled 'the Craftsman', he was a chief among the Tuatha de Danaan (27)


Credne Cerd - styled 'the Brazier' (64), a worker in brass for the Tuatha de Danaan (37)


Cridenbel - an idle blind man with a sharp tongue who always demanded the Dagda's three best bits of food. Starving, the Dagda hid three pieces of gold in the three bits and this killed Cridenbel (33).


Crimthan Cass - the King of Connacht and father of Laegaire (121)


Cron - mother of Fianlug, she was at the forge of Goibniu grinding spears when Ruadan was killed (64)


Crow of Battle - see Morrigu (27)


Cruacha - the maidservant of Etain who accompanied her when she departed with Midhir. Cruachan in Connacht was named after her (96)


Cruachan Aigle - one of the twelve chief mountains of Ireland (q.v.) (62)


Cu - along with Cian (q.v.) and Ceithen, he was one of the three sons of Cainte. Cu and Ceithen went towards the south, while Cian went north, to gather the Riders of the Sidh to help Lugh in his battle with Bres (43).


Cuailgne - the son of Breagan, he and his brother Fuad, two of the best leaders of the Sons of the Gael, were both killed in the rout of the Tuatha De Danaan (he at Slieve Cuailgne), following the Battle of Tailltin (75)


Cualu - the home of Celtchar (88)


Cuan - the wood of Cuan was cleared away by Duach and the men of Ireland so there could be a gathering around Taillte's grave (68)


Culain - although he may have been Manannan in another guise, he was the great smith, originally living on the Island of Falga, who was invited by Conchubar to live on the plains of Muirthemne, where Cuchulain killed his great dog and thereafter took the name Cuchulain, meaning 'the hound of Culain' (98)

An Irish Myth Concordance A-C D-L M-Z

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